TripleMania XXX: Chapter 3 - Pentagon Jr. vs. Villano IV

Originally published at https://www.postwrestling.com/2022/10/16/triplemania-xxx-chapter-3-pentagon-jr-vs-villano-iv/

TripleMania XXX: Chapter 3 – Pentagon Jr. vs. Villano IV

By: thecubsfan from Luchablog.com

TripleMania XXX: Chapter 3 took place Saturday night in Mexico City. The third TripleMania of AAA’s 30th Anniversary year had the biggest expectations, with a giant mask match and a highly anticipated title match. Villano IV vs. Pentagon Jr. and Fenix vs. Hijo del Vikingo delivered to expectations and will go down as two of the best matches in Mexico all year.

TripleMania is available as VOD on FITE in both Spanish and English. The stream was a struggle. AAA chose to have the English announcers call the show from home instead of bringing them to Mexico City, which was a big mistake. The presentation of the English language feed was poor enough that FITE probably should offer refunds or redo the stream entirely. The English feed had issues throughout; even when they finally got it working, the audio seemed to be a few moments behind the video for most of the show. The Spanish feed had issues as well, but lesser ones, and it is the definite version to listen to if you’re going to watch this back later.

The rest of the show was a mixed bag. AAA put a lot of effort into production and entrances, which paid off most of the time. Many of the wrestlers had spectacular gear for this show. They had a giant video set, which looked impressive until AAA kept pulling back to show it (shrinking the wrestlers to the size of ants.) The camera choices remain heavily WWE-influenced, with lots of camera switches and cutting to shots of fans even during pinfalls. The other matches were far outshined by the closing two. Both Taya/Kamille and Ciber/Pagano were brawls, with the women executing better than the men, but the fans being more into the long built-up feud. The multi-man matches had spectacular moments and were too chaotic to be more than those moments.

AAA seems aware they have these issues and often tries to work around them rather than fix them. A great example was the referee’s work on this show. Every singles match of importance on this show was officiated by former WWE (and Lucha Underground) referee Marty Elias, who only works for AAA on big shows. The only exception was Cibernetico/Pagano, which had a referee bump to set up a Vampiro appearance. AAA doesn’t trust their other referees to handle their essential matches, and for a good reason. They’re also not going to replace those referees full-time. They’ll just bring in someone more.

Two preliminary matches – the Marvel Lucha Libre match and the Copa Baradahl – did not air on the FITE broadcast. They’ll air on next week’s AAA TV show instead. Marvel Lucha Libre character El Furioso (believed to be Ciudad Juarez’s El Dragon) suffered a significant injury in the Marvel match. AAA hasn’t updated his status.

AAA’s broadcast started with a military band playing the music of AAA wrestlers past and present, finishing with the AAA theme. The usual playing of the national anthem followed. A Rey Mysterio Jr. video message aired, congratulating AAA on 30 years of existence. AAA thanked WWE for letting Rey send in the message.

Hermanos Lee (Dragón Lee & Dralistico) defeated Los Vipers (Látigo & Toxin) and Komander & Myzteziz and Arez & Willie Mack to earn a future AAA Tag Team Championship match (10:22)

Hermanos Lee lost to FTR in a title match back in March after Pentagon’s interference backfired, and they’ve been waiting for a rematch since. Arez was formerly a member of Los Vipers but was booted out of the group after being hesitant to attack old friend Fenix.

Los Hermanos Lee won a frantic match that defied play-by-play. The match started with Mack dancing and went into high spot after high spot. So much happened and very little of it had much time to sink in. Dralistico won with a double underhook driver on Toxin to earn the title shot. There was so much going on that Dragon Lee’s headscissors to the floor, usually a huge spot, just happened almost quietly before the finish. Announcers pushed that the FTR/Hermanos Lee match would happen soon.

Highlights included a Komander/Mzteziz rope walking 450/SSP spot, a Dragon Lee bullet tope near going over the rail, and a Dralistico plancha into the crowd. Myzteziz also executed a double poison rana off the ropes on Latigo & Arez to the floor, falling onto everyone else. A Komander attempt to walk three corners (of the six-sided ring) didn’t quite work out, but his makeup dive went well.

‘Fans’ threw Dr. Simi dolls in the ring after the match for Willie Mack. A trend at Mexican concerts is to throw the mascot of a ubiquitous Mexico Farmacias Similares pharmacy chain as a strange sign of respect. A fan also did this at a CMLL show last month. Those wrestlers and security treated it as unwanted as anything else thrown into the ring, which got some media attention. In AAA’s version, Willie Mack looked confused at the doll until ‘Dr. Simi’ started speaking on the microphone, and more Dr. Simi dolls fell from the ceiling. Life-size Dr. Simi mascots appeared with fans in the crowd, and one on the stage challenged Willie Mack to a dance-off. All the referees wore the Dr. Simi logo on their shirts as part of the sponsorship deal.

Taya © defeated Kamille to retain the AAA’s Reina de Reinas championship (16:47)

This match was s Taya’s fourth defense, though the first actually in AAA. It’s the first Reina de Reinas title match in Mexico since last August. Kamille previously defeated Taya for the NWA Women’s Championship in August. Taya wore an outfit paying tribute to AAA’s La Parka. Arez (Taya) and Flammer (Kamille) were seconds. Flammer is owed a match against the winner. Announcers quickly mentioned the match was no disqualification before the match; all AAA matches are implicitly no disqualification, so this was more a signal weapon shots were coming soon. We didn’t see most of Kamille’s entrance because AAA mistakenly replayed the Rey Mysterio video earlier. Kamille/Taya was a lot of weapon spots on a show that would have plenty more.

The match started immediately after the belt presentation, with Kamille using a chair to take control. Taya held up from running a whip into the chair, only to take a cookie sheet to the head. Taya bled from the shot, and Kamille rubbed the blood over her face. Taya crawled out to the ramp, and Kamille followed with more cookie shots. AAA’s feed went out for about twenty seconds. Taya and Kamille exchanged shots as they resumed, with Kamille knocking Taya down and landing a dropkick and a missile dropkick to a trash can. Kamille covered for two, then rolled out to set up a table with the help of Flammer. Taya turned around a whip to send Kamille into a chair wedged in the corner, then made a kick/punch comeback. Taya hung Faby into the ropes, then slid for a pulling powerbomb, which didn’t quite come together. A trash can shot to the head was more effective, as were more cookie shots. Taya brought Kamille back in for a two-count. Taya grabbed Kamille for her finish, but Kamille broke out and sent Taya into the corner. Taya got up a kick on a charge, but Kamille immediately recovered to bring Taya into a modified torture rack, dropping Taya down in a powerbomb for two. Taya reversed a chokeslam into a slow bodyscissors and a takedown. Taya went up top, but Kamille cut her off, then took them both to the mat with a superplex. That led to another two count. A Canadian Destroyer also got two. Kamille charged at Taya in the corner, but Taya moved, and Kamille hit the post on the way out. Taya followed her out, stopping to high-five some fans. Taya went back in and up for a dive, but Kamilel cut her off for at least the third time. Taya, this time was able to pull Kamille down by her hair. Taya lifted Kamille on her shoulders on another exchange, an impressive show of power, and dropped Kamille face first on the apron. Taya brought Kamille back in for another two count. Taya connected on running knees in the corner, but it didn’t have much effect. The two fought to the apron, setting up a Taya cutter through the table on the floor. The AAA table didn’t break as usual. Flammer helped Kamille, only for Arez to take her out with a surprise tope. Kamille went to the top for a plancha, Taya rolled through and locked in a modified camel clutch, let it go, reapplied it, and Kamille submitted after a few more moments of struggle. That was an odd ending.

Konnan talked about 30 years of TripleMania but barely got into it before he was interrupted by Ciebrentico and other members of Los Vipers, who had been looking for a fight with Konnan for months. Cibernetico mocked Konnan, sarcastically pointed out Konnan’s role as director of talent, and led the Vipers into a beatdown of Konnan. This fight wasn’t a lot of violence, but it’s rare Konnan takes anything at all, and it was a clear sign he’d be getting revenge by the end of the night.

Brian Cage, Johnny Caballero, and Sam Adonis won a three-way match with Nuevas Generacion (Cuatrero, Forastero, Sansón) and Bandido, Laredo Kid, Psycho Clown where the AAA World Trios Championship was on the line, but the winning team did not win the titles (13:26)

NGD are the champions making their first defense. Sam Adonis was part of the previous La Empresa champion team and is feuding with Psycho Clown. Estrellita accompained Adonis. A live band played Johnny Caballero’s music to boos. Caballero brought his stick horse, “Lorenzo de Llama.” The tecnicos wore fused masks, elements of the three designs mixed. Psycho Clown also had a Ghost Rider motif. In another last-minute stipulation, the announcers explained that the titles would only change hands if NGD got pinned. That made it clear that NGD wasn’t winning but wasn’t getting pinned before the match started. The match was every three-way match; there was a lot of effort but no direction outside of one team breaking up another team’s momentum. Adonis and Psycho feuded, while the finish focused on an occasional Laredo Kid/Johnny Caballero issue.

Psycho and Adonis started with punches, going from corner to corner with strikes. Psycho got a powerslam for two count before Adonis took control back with punches. Adonis came off the ropes, and Psycho tossed him into a stiff forearm. Psycho shoved Adonis out of the ring and followed with a moonsault. Estrellita, Caballeor and Cage attakced Pyscho on the otuside. NGD and the other tecnicos took over the ring, with Bandido & Laredo Kid clearing out their opponents. Forastero cut off a dive attempt with a double clothesline. Caballero came in next but lost out to the numbers. Sanson & Cuatrero held Caballero for a Forastero top rope double stomp and a two count. Bandido came in but took a backbreaker/splash combo. Cuatrero caught a Lareod plancha and slammed him, but the Adonis team broke up pins and took over the ring before much more could happen. Caballero landed a standing SSP on Forastero. Adonis kicked Cuatrero out of the ring. As they were working over Sanson, Psycho tried to come in with a cookie shot; it didn’t work out for him. Adonis got Psycho with a springboard DDT as Mundo gave Lareod a flipping DDT. Forastero staged a brief comeback against the Americans, but Mundo cut him off with a springboard dropkick. A Cage F5 set up Adoni’s 450 splash, Psycho Clown breaking up the pin. Psycho fought off all three Americans for a moment before being pounded. The Americans held Psycho for more, which gave Bandidot the chance to springboard in with a dropkick to break it out. Bandido and Lareod took out Cage and Caballero with dives, and Psycho got the better of Adonis (and Estrellita) in the ring, with a near fall on a Code Red. Adonis immediately came back with a Michinoku Driver for two. Psycho and Adonis battled to the top rope for a Spanish Fly for two. Estrellita broke it up, NGD took her out, and Adonis of the way. Psycho was left one on three and nearly pinned after a triple corner kick. Bandido broke up the pin in time. NGD tossed Bandido out and brought Laredo in, but a double chop spot missed. Bandido and Laredo made a comeback on NGD, only for Cage and Caballero to break it up. Bandido press slammed Cage to a loud reaction, and Cage fired back with a discus clothesline. Mundo and Laredo exchanged Destroyers for near falls. Cage monkey flipped Bandido over the top rope and to the floor, taking out Adonis and Forastero. Cage went out, and Sanson on him with a springboard plancha. Caballero cut off another Lareod dive attempt. Laredo stopped Caballero with a Michinoku Driver but missed connecting on a fantastic tornillo splash. Caballero decided now was the time to ride his stick horse. Laredo confiscated the stick horse and tried to hit Caballero with it, but referee Marty Elias confiscated it for no apparent reason. Caballero snuck in a foul and pinned Laredo Kid for the win, which also meant NGD retained the trios titles. Spanish announcers put this over as extending NGD’s undefeated streak, which is true in that they weren’t beating but felt less important with that finish.

AAA aired a Hall of Fame segment for Arturo Rivera, who passed away in February. Hugo Savonivich brought out Rivera’s family as part of the reveal of the plaque. Blue Demon Jr. also came up to accept a Hall of Fame plaque for his father, who would’ve turned 100. Blue Demon Jr. started to talk, and Savonivich quickly cut him off to show a Blue Demon Sr. video package.

Pagano defeated Cibernético in a hair vs. hair match (22:03)

Cibernetico is the leader of Los Vipers, a faction he led in the 90s/00s, then reformed upon his return to the promotion last year. Los Vipers members Abismo Negro Jr., Toxin, and Latigo, accompanied their leader. AAA followers expected it to be messy and interference filled, and it was. It was also about five minutes longer than needed, perhaps due to Pagano missing on multiple dives and both men seeming to lose track of what they were doing. The live crowd was into the characters and the result. Anyone coming in with no AAA history would instead see this as a terrible match, with Pagano being more error-prone than usual.

Cibernetico and Pagano started fighting as AAA was showing their match-up graphic. (If AAA employed someone to cue wrestlers on when to start, that person was often ignored during the show.) The two collided awkwardly. Pagano tossed Ciber through the ropes and held up instead of diving into a cookie sheet shot. The Vipers didn’t think to just ready the sheet up a second time, and Pagano landed the dive next time. Pagano fought Cibernetico around the ring, set up a table, and went for a dive to put them both through a table. Pagano instead hit the ropes on the way through and came up way short. Ciber had moved, so they got where they were going (a missed dive) in a more humiliating fashion. All four Vipers beat up Pagano in the ring and then tossed him over the top rope to the ramp. The Vipers reset up a table while Ciber kept Pagano busy. Ciber started to empty out of a bag, then stopped, apparently realizing that spot was for later. Ciber instead elbow drop Pagano through the table, which actually did break this time. Ciber brought Pagano, threw him off the top rope, and covered for two. Los Vipers went back to stomping Pagano, that tactic being reasonably successful so far. Both men were b bleeding decently by this point. Pagano shoved Ciber off the middle rope and dropkicked him to start a comeback. The Vipers, hanging outside the ring, tripped up Pagano to give Cibernetico back control. Cibernetico elbow-dropped Pagano once and got caught in an armbar the second time. Pagano pulled a fork out from his boot, stabbed Ciber, and licked the blood.

Los Vipers, perhaps as disgusted by that as I was, broke up the attack. Charly Manson, a former friend of Cibernetico, ran out for the save but made the mistake of standing in front of Cibernetico and standing still until Ciber hit him with a cookie sheet. An easy mistake to make. Charly did hand Pagano a light tube, which he swung at Cibernetico and connected with Hijo del Tirantes by mistake. Ciber went out of the ring, Pagano followed with a dive and came up short on a dive for the second time in the match, AAA fans will go with Pagano a long way, but that killed the crowd. Both men stalled and waved at the crowd, giving Pagano time to recover and for the crowd to get back into it. Pagano set up a chair in the center of the ring and slammed Pagano onto the chair, but of course, Tirantes was still out. Vampiro, a special referee in previous AAA TV shows, slowly walked to the ring and eventually made it for a two-count. Pagano put Ciber in a half crab while Vampiro argued with the Vipers. Everyone seemed to be waiting for something. Pagano hit Ciber with a cookie sheet, positioned him to stand near the corner, slowly climbed up, and did nothing until Ciber hit him awkwardly with a chair. The match seemed off the rails at this point, and Ciber and Pagano talked a bunch about what was next. Of all things, a Ciber middle rope huracanrana was next, for a two count. Medics took Hijo del Tirantes to the back as Ciber swatted Pagano with a kendo stick. Ciber went to the apron for a discussion with the people in the corner. Vampiro made an X sign, which the announcers insisted was very real. It did seem plausible Pagano had some sort of concussion at this point, though this was a worked X spot. Pagano recovered enough to swat Ciber, dump out the thumbtack bag, and give Ciber a DDT through the ropes and onto the tacks. That also got two. Despite some slow and bad action, the crowd got loud on the near fall. Pagano reversed a Ciber attempted chokeslam into a cradle for two. Pagano got a barbed wire chair from somewhere and threw it weakly at Ciber. Ciber easily dodged and chokeslammed Pagano onto it for another near fall. Ciber grabbed the rest of the thumbtacks, dumped them on the mat, and chokeslammed Pagano. He didn’t waste time going for a cover, and the two battled to the apron instead, with Ciber spearing/shoving Pagano to the floor and into the remains of a previously broken table. Ciber covered Pagano on the floor to two. Vampiro told the Vipers to leave, though they didn’t – they just hung out as more meaningless two falls took place. The Vipers stomped Ciber as Manson went to the back for some reason. Konnan made his return, took out all of the Vipers with ease, and had a brief staring contest with Vampiro. Pagano and Ciber were suddenly shown climbing a ladder on the stage, with no idea why or where the ladder came from. Vampiro and Charly Manson very distractedly stood on both sides to steady the ladder. Pagano gave Ciber an Air Raid Crash off the ladder, through the stage, and presumably onto some padding underneath. (The table they set was a misdirection and not used.) Vampiro counted a three count for Pagano, though viewers couldn’t actually see the pin or which guy was on top. The music guy magically knew to play Pagano’s song for the win.

Cibernetico was immediately put on a stretcher and taken towards an ambulance as if that was the last we were going to see him. The announcers noted Ciber was not living up to the hair stipulation. AAA cut backstage again, Ciber sat up on the stretcher, and Pagano cut some of his hair. Pagano and Ciber shook hands. Vampiro and one of the Mexico City lucha libre commissioners shaved the remainder of Cibernetico’s hair.

A Fenix/Vikingo video focused on AAA’s history of exciting flying luchadors and how both men had started their careers in the promotion.

Hijo Del Vikingo defeated Fénix to retain the AAA Mega Championship (19:30)

This match is Hijo del Vikingo’s sixth defense of the title, though only two have come on AAA TV and none since February. Fenix lost this championship to Kenny Omega in 2019 and had not received a title rematch. Comedian/social media person/small show ex-wrestler Lalo Elizarrarás introduced Fenix for the match. Hijo del Vikingo was accompanied by his family, many of whom are also viking themed luchadors. His father, the actual El Vikingo, stayed at ringside as his second. Arez seconded Fenix. The announcers emphasized Kenny Omega would’ve been here if they hadn’t suspended him, which felt like it diminished the two people in the match as if we should be disappointed seeing this match. No one actually felt disappointed watching this match. This match had incredible moments of athleticism, hard-hitting moments, and a great run of action. Vikingo is more of a complete wrestler than just highlights; he was hurting by the end and doing some intelligent selling at times. This match was outstanding.

Fenix and Vikingo started with a lockup, and Fenix backed Vikingo into the corner. Vikingo got a casita out of the following exchange, Fenix escaping into a bodyscissors and rolling Vikingo over for two. The two exchanged counters, Fenix getting a campana for a moment before the two battled to another stalemate. Vikingo sped up the match with a twisting headscissors (where a springboard didn’t go quite right) and another reverse spinning headscissors that sent Fenix out. Vikingo went up, Fenix cut him off with an uppercut, and took him off the ropes with a springboard huracanrana. Fenix stayed on top of Vikingo and punched down. Both men made it up to their feet, with Fenix ending up on the apron after a couple of reversals. Vikingo charged for a spear to take them both to the floor, only for Fenix to block it and DDT Vikingo on the apron. Fenix went after Vikingo’s forehead on the floor, seemingly looking for blood. Fenix brought Vikingo back in and kicked him twice in the head. Fenix ran, rolled, and jumped into a Vikingo scoop. Fenix fought out for a suplex, and Vikingo reversed to a small package. Vikingo hesitated, and Fenix landed a big clothesline. Fenix grabbed Vikingo on the mat, and Vikingo used leverage to jump upwards over the top for a code red. Fenix went out, and Vikingo came off the post into a springboard into something like a reverse tope con giro. I’m not sure I can capture how crazy that move looked.

Fenix recovered first on the floor, lifted Fenix on his shoulders, and fell prey to a poison rana. Fenix slowly recovered, and Vikingo followed after him with a Spanish fly. Both men were bleeding, though not as heavily as in the previous match. Fenix crawled back in, Vikingo following with a springboard 450 splash. Fenix and Vikingo battled to the ramp, Fenix scoring with a forearm and then a cutter. Vikingo got to his feet first but didn’t get much on a spinning sidewalk slam. He seemed to have an arm issue but insisted to referee Marty Elias that he was good to go on. Both men slowly crawled back into the ring. Vikingo brought Fenix back in for another slam, but Fenix escaped and slid out of the ring. Fenix knocked Vikingo back and rolled in, but Vikingo caught Fenix again and, this time, planted Fenix with the spinning sidewalk slam. That got a two-count. Fenix surprised Vikingo with a roll, leaping up to land a double stomp. Fenix set up Vikingo on the middle rope and pulled him off for a reverse Spanish Fly for another two count, then an inverted frog splash for another two count. Fenix picked up Vikingo for more, but Vikingo reversed to a snap huracanrana for another neat fall. Vikingo superkicked Vikingo to keep hit on the floor, then moved to the ramp. Vikingo ran back in for a springboard 630 senton, but it still wasn’t enough to keep Fenix down. Vikingo kicked Fenix in the face and went up top, landing a conventional top rope 630 senton, and still not enough. Only with Vikingo do we have to separate the kinds of 630 sentons he does.

Fenix rolled out to escape the run, and Vikingo pursued, landing a forearm to knock Fenix into the crowd. Fenix jumped onto the rail, but Vikingo kept Fenix on the outside with a kick. Vikingo went for a barricade move of his own, and Fenix repaid the favor by superkicking Fenix. Fenix added some crotch chops, then set up Vikingo hanging off the barricade. Fenix went back in and came off the top rope with a flying leg drop; he borrowed that idea from Psicosis (I) and Extreme Tiger. Fenix brought Vikingo back to finish him off with the Fire Driver, connected with it, and Vikingo somehow kicked out at two. Fenix landed another Fire Driver, with a lot less protection on that move than usual, and still, Vikingo kicked out before three. The Mexico crowd broke into an Esto es Lucha chant at this point, and both wrestlers took a moment to soak it in and recover. Fenix went up top, Vikingo followed, nearly losing their balance, and Vikingo pulled Fenix off into a super poison rana. Fenix actually fell on top of Vikingo in the move before bouncing off, which Vikingo sold while crawling over to cover Fenix for a two-count. Both escaped to opposite corners, Vikingo recovering first and landing his running corner knee smash. Vikingo ascended one last time, landed the Cuerno del Vikingo, and got the three count to retain the championship.

Fenix and Vikingo shook hands after the match, each putting over the other in shows of respect. Vikingo seemed to be dealing with back and wrist issues by the end of the match. Fans threw money into the ring.

Pentagón Jr. beat Villano IV in a mask vs. mask (25:22)

This match is the final of the year-long Ruleta de la Muerte tournament, where the ultimate loser of the tournament would have to unmask. Villano IV lost to LA Park and Psycho Clown. Pentagon Jr. lost to Ultimo Dragon, and Blue Demon Jr. Villano IV was accompanied by his last living brother Villano V, his son, and various nephews. Penta had an elaborate entrance with dancers and a live presentation of his music. Penta then ran directly into a backdrop on the apron to start the match. Villano V and Arez were the seconds; this was Arez’s fourth appearance on the show. Villano IV and Penta had the expected hard-hitting brawl, with a more serious (and less gesturing) Penta than seen elsewhere. There were also some specific callbacks to past famous Villano matches, a special touch for this match. Penta looked great, but Villano IV had three career-best matches in this tournament.

Villano IV brought Penta back into the ring, ripped up his mask, and smashed Penta’s head into the buckles. V4 went out to look for something under the ring, couldn’t find it, and returned to stomp Penta. V4 sent Penta into the post, then reused his search. he found a cookie sheet, which didn’t seem worth the effort. He did use it to hit Penta in the head repeatedly. V4 brought Penta in and out of the ring of variations of weapon shots to the head. V4 switched from ripping up Penta’s mask to ripping Penta’s top, though he struggled to get it to rip as he wanted. Penta got to his feet, only for V4 to punch him directly in the face. Penta ripped his gear as he recovered. V4 kept on Penta with targeted punches before setting up a board on the outside. Penta fired back and tried to powerbomb V4 through it, but V4 fought him off and shoved Penta back. Penta charged and again took a back body drop, this time into the board. V4 took it back inside, where Penta avoided a corner charge and fought back with swinging kicks. A Penta kick knocked V4 out of the ring, Villano 5 checked on his brother, and Penta took them out with a tope con giro. Penta brought V4 back in to rip up his mask. Penta stomped V4’s face repeatedly, only stopping to fix his mask. Penta brought V4 to the apron, smacking his forehead into the post repeatedly (and over the objections of the referee.) Penta paused to argue with Villano V before smacking V4 with the cookie sheet.

Arez and Villano V nearly got into a fight, checking on their men. Penta exchanged punches and kicks on the outside, Villano V coming out better as the brawl turned uglier. A second exchange started after a missed V4 charge, and Penta used that to control the action a bit better. The two took the brawl back into the ring for the first time in a few minutes, Penta landing a superkick and an Aguayo double stomp for two. Penta pounded Villano with punches in the corner, lifted Villano 4, and drove him through a table set in the corner with a death valley driver. That wasn’t quite enough to put away Villano IV. Penta landed a top rope double stomp but still could only get two. Penta started desperately going for cradle to no success. V4 battled up to a tirabuzon, then rolled into a cradle – the same sequence Villano V had used for his upset victory of Blue Panther – but it was only two this time. Penta and V4 started exchanging slaps to the face, Penta winning by switching to forearms. Penta pulled out a second rope leg drop for a near fall before the brawl started again. Penta pulled Villano IV into the Atlantida – the same finish that cost Villano III his match – and believed Villano 4 gave up and let go. According to the referee, Villano IV had not submitted, and Penta’s premature celebration ended with him rammed into the post. V4 covered for two. Penta fired up and gave V4 his armbreaker – and then the move a second time, but V4 wouldn’t stay down.

The crowd got louder behind Villano, and he surprised Penta with an ankle lock. Penta battled to get to the ropes, hit himself in the head to keep going, and Villano 4 dragged him back. This time, it was V4 who Penta gave up, but referee Marty Elias said it wasn’t a submission. V4 argued, then turned into a small package – for two. Penta signaled for Factor Miedo, V4 reverse to the tirabuzon, but Penta reversed to his version and went for his take on the famous cradle. It still was not enough. Penta gave V4 a big running kick to the face, then the armbreaker a third time, and got the three.

The Villanos, Fenix, Taya, Konnan, and others all came to the ring for the unmasking. Villano IV spoke about his mask being the dearest thing to him outside his family, his retirement approaching, and wanting to face Penta again in his last match (while implying this wouldn’t be it.) He unmasked as Tomas Diaz Mendoza, 57 years old, 42 years a wrestler, and he is the last of the five brothers to lose his mask. His nephews carried him around the ring as part of an emotional scene to close the show.

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